Israel Denies NRA's False Claims About School Shootings

| by Michael Allen

Appearing on NBC's 'Meet the Press' on Sunday, NRA Exec. VP Wayne LaPierre (pictured) made the unsupported claim that most American parents want armed security guards in schools.

He also said: “Israel had a whole lot of school shootings, until they did one thing. They said we’re going to stop it and they put armed security in every school and they have not had a problem since then.”

However, Yigal Palmor, spokesman for the Israeli Foreign Ministry, denied LaPierre's claims, reports the NY Daily News

Palmor told the NY Daily News: "We didn’t have a series of school shootings, and they had nothing to do with the issue at hand in the United States. We had to deal with terrorism."

“What removed the danger was not the armed guards, but an overall anti-terror policy and anti-terror operations which brought street terrorism down to nearly zero over a number of years. It would be better not to drag Israel into what is an internal American discussion."

Reuven Berko, a retired Israeli Army colonel and senior police officer, added: “There is no comparison between maniacs with psychological problems opening fire at random to kill innocent people and trained terrorists trying to murder Israeli children."

“Israeli citizens are not allowed to carry guns unless they are serving in the army or working in security-related jobs that require them to use a weapon."

The worst attack on an Israeli school was in 1974, when terrorists from the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine took 115 people hostage in a school in Maalot, Israel.

Prof. Gerald Steinberg of Bar-Ilan University said: “The attempt to compare the two tragedies is absurd. Palestinian terror attacks like one one at Maalot, the goal of which was to use the children as hostages in order to free other terrorists, are totally different from crimes committed by deranged people with guns.”

Yakov Amit, head of the firearms licensing department of the Public Security Ministry, said: “In a country where hundreds of thousands of people carry firearms, it is essential to manage the training, licensing and authorization of those who wish to be armed."