Girl, 10, Shoots Guns in Adult Competitions (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Shyanne Roberts is only 10 years old, but is already an experienced competitive shooter.

"I want to be an inspiration to other kids and be a leader," Shyanne told CNN (video below). "Kids and guns don't always mean bad things happen."

Shyanne normally competes against shooters under 18, but she recently came in second in the Women's Division of the New Jersey Ruger Rimfire Challenge.

The young girl will compete against 200 women shooters at the Brownell's Lady 3-Gun Pro-Am Challenge in Covington, Georgia, on Oct. 31.

Shyanne, who lives in Franklinville, New Jersey, started firing guns at the age of six when her dad began taking her to a gun range.

Shyanne started competing at age seven.

"We can teach fourth-graders safe-sex practices, but we can't mention teaching firearm education in a public grade school without anti-gun groups having a complete meltdown," said Shyanne's dad, Dan Roberts. "It's completely ludicrous."

However, Dan Gross, president of the Brady Campaign and Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, countered, "It's not to say that teaching your kids gun safety can't help, but relying on that alone is an extremely dangerous mentality. I see tragedies every day that wind up occurring because a parent thought that their child knew better."

According to, a study in the medical journal Pediatrics found that 20 children are hospitalized every day in the U.S. because of gun injuries.

The study was led by Dr. John Leventhal of the Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital child abuse program.

According to the study, hospital records showed there were 7,391 hospitalizations of children in 2009 because of guns. 453 of those kids died while in the hospital. The study didn't include children who died due to gunshot wounds and never made it to the hospital.

Almost one-third of the gun injuries were accidents and more than half were an attack on the child.

"Three firearms-related patients each day are younger than 15 years of age," stated Dr. Leventhal. "This is a tragedy. There are substantial injuries to these children that may have lifelong consequences."

Sources: CNN,