Society

Bloomberg Says "Strategy is Working," Gun Crimes Down 30% in NYC Since 2000

| by Dabney Bailey
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A new study by the Health Department found that gun deaths have dropped 30% from 2000 to 2011 in New York City. On a national level, this decline is something of an anomaly. National gun deaths remained relatively static during the same period.

Lead by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, New York has some of the strictest gun control laws in the country, including the much-hated stop-and-frisk program. Civil rights activists and gun proponents have cried foul over Bloomberg’s aggressive strategies, but based on this statistic it seems like New York City laws are actually working.

The city has seen a decrease in gun violence across the board, with a drop in murders, suicides, and accidental shooting. About 84% of the city’s gun deaths are from homicides, which far exceeds the national average. On a national level, the bulk of gun deaths are from suicides. It isn’t terribly surprising that New York City suffers from high levels of gun violence, considering the city’s size and its constant gun violence. Neighborhoods like East New York, Central Harlem, South Bronx, and Crown Heights have gun homicide rates that are more than twice the city’s average. In these neighborhoods, guns were the leading cause of death for men between the age of 15 and 24.

New York City still has a gun violence problem – there’s no doubt about that – the only question that remains is whether or not Bloomberg’s strategies are the solution. Bloomberg recently argued on his weekly radio address, "There’s just no question that our strategy is working.”

It may be effective, but that doesn’t necessarily verify the Constitutionality of the laws. The New York Civil Liberties Union and several other civil rights groups have tried to fight the stop-and-frisk law without much luck. Similarly, gun rights activists in New York City have vilified Bloomberg for his gun grabbing strategies.

It’s a tough equation to balance – you have to admire Bloomberg’s results, but are they worth the price?

Source: NY Daily News