Society

Vermont High School Rejects Girl's Grad Photos Due To Cleavage (Photos)

| by Sean Kelly
photo of another girl in yearbook with cleavage showingphoto of another girl in yearbook with cleavage showing

A Barre, Vermont, teen’s graduation photos were rejected for her high school yearbook because she was showing cleavage.

Lillian Clark, 17, said she found out in an email that the photo she and her family loved so much was rejected by Spaulding High School and would not be appearing in her yearbook, WCAX reports.

“The photo is lovely," Clark said to WCAX, reading from the email she received. "Before it can be accepted, we have to abide to school policy in regard to dress code and cleavage."

Clark said she has other photos, but she and her family loved one in particular so they submitted it.

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“I wanted something sweeter, so I wanted a dress or a skirt,” she said.

She said she noticed several pictures in the previous year’s yearbook that violated school guidelines for dress code.

“She even has cleavage showing, but her hair is kind of covering it. But you can tell it's there,” Clark said of one photo.

The teen said there’s simply nothing she can do about the way the picture turned out.

“Having a bigger chest is part of who I am,” she said. “It’s not like I can change it.”

One of Clark’s friends also had a photo rejected.

The school’s superintendent responded to the rejection, saying that a decision had to be made based on what the school felt was appropriate.

“The purpose of our procedures is to provide the most positive educational environment and climate for all of our students,” superintendent John Pandolfo told WCAX over the phone.

“So where is that boundary between appropriate and inappropriate?" he added. "And that decision is in the hands of the administration of the school. And then, most importantly, when that decision is made it's then applied to all students.”

The school offered Clark one solution for making the photo appropriate enough to be included — photoshop. Opposed to the idea of doctoring her photo, Clark said she hopes the school will change their minds. 

Sources: Mad World News, WCAX / Photo credit: WCAX, Mad World News