Newspaper Publishes Anti-Transgender Ad, Outrage Follows

| by Michael Allen

The Star Tribune, a newspaper in Minneapolis, Minn., ran a full page anti-transgender ad yesterday that stated, "A male wants to shower beside your 14-year-old daughter. Are YOU okay with that?"

The ad (posted on Twitter by David Brauer) was paid for by the Minnesota Child Protection League, which is trying to rally support against a proposal that would allow transgender students to compete in sports based on their self-identifying gender.

Minnesota State High School League officials are considering the proposal, which would require documentation from a doctor and proof of hormone therapy in some instances, noted the Twin Cities Daily Planet.

According to, the Minnesota Child Protection League are a "group of veteran religious right and tea party activists" who also opposed an anti-bullying law called the "Safe and Supportive Schools Act."

The Minnesota Child Protection League's spokesperson is Barb Anderson, who is quoted as once stating, "The greatest threat to our freedom and the health and well-being of our children is from this radical homosexual agenda that is just so pervasive." reports that several people slammed the Star Tribune for the ad with tweets such as:

I'm ready to cancel my @StarTribune Sunday subscription over the ridiculous anti-transgender ad they allowed in today's paper.

Well that's the end of my buying the Star Tribune.

Ad casting trans students as aggressors when they're often viciously targeted is horrid. Why did @StarTribune publishers amplify that hate?

"The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy," Steve Yaeger, the Star Tribune's VP of marketing and public relations told

When asked about the Star Tribune's advertising policies, Yeager stated, "If you were doing a story on how media of all kinds (broadcast, print, digital) handle campaign and advocacy advertising, I'd consider how we could contribute to the conversation. But I don't think that's what you're doing."

Sources:,, Twin Cities Daily Planet