Society

Gay Reporter James Kirchick Slams 'Russia Today' News for Russia's Anti-Gay Laws (Video)

| by Michael Allen
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Gay journalist James Kirchick was invited on a "Russia Today" newscast this morning to discuss the verdict of whistleblower Pfc. Bradley Manning.

Instead of talking about Manning's verdict, Kirchick accused Russia Today of lying to its audience, noted The Washington Free Beacon.

“You have twenty-four hours a day to lie about the United States and to ignore what’s going on in Russia. I’m gonna take my two minutes to tell people the truth," said Kirchick (video below).

"Being silent in the face of evil is something that we can’t do, so being here on a Kremlin-funded propaganda network, I’m going to wear my gay pride suspenders and speak out against the horrific, anti-gay legislation that Vladimir Putin has signed into law.”

When a Russia Today host asked Kirchick a second time about Manning, he responded: "I’m not interested in talking about Bradley Manning. I’m interested in talking about the horrific environment of homophobia in Russia right now, and to let the Russian gay people know that they have friends and allies in solidarity from people all over the world, and that we’re not going to be silenced in the face horrific repression that is perpetrated by your paymaster, Vladimir Putin.”

When Kirchick was told that Russia Today had covered anti-gay laws in the country, Kirchick claimed that Russian journalists would be jailed if they did, which has not happened.

Kirchick was soon removed from the broadcast.

One of the Russia Today hosts told the audience: “We invited a guest on to discuss the fate of the whistleblower, but he used the chance to discuss his views on other unrelated issues and that’s why we had to take him off air. We would like to say sorry for any confusion caused.”

Later, Kirchick tweeted on Twitter: "True fact: @RT_com just called taxi company that took me to studio to drop me off on the side of the highway on way to Stockholm airport."

Sources: The Washington Free Beacon and Twitter