Society

Federal Employee Kenneth Kuban Sends Creepy Men to Ex-Girlfriend's House Through Craigslist Ads

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A federal employee sought revenge for his girlfriend of six months dumping him, so he posed as her in a series of Craigslist "Casual Encounters" ads, convincing men to come visit.

Kenneth Kuban, 61, worked at the Library of Congress as a film preservationist. He began posting the ads after the 64-year-old woman ended their "intimate relationship" in 2011. 

The ad said the woman, only identified as "L.M." in court documents, wanted to meet a "gentleman in his 50s that is Hung and that can give [her] some pleasuring." 

One ad posted in February even featured a photo of L.M.

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For months, she had to deal with strange men visiting her house uninvited, as men replied to the ads and Kuban provided them with the address. 

She filed a restraining order against Kuban, but he continued to post the ads.

It wasn't until investigators conducted an undercover sting that they were able to put an end to the nightmare. 

Agents replied to an ad he posted on March 12. He then sent a photo of the woman and gave them her address. He told them, "just park by my mail box and walk up my lane i'll meet at the front door."

He was arrested on Friday and faces charges of felony stalking. 

Over the months it took to arrest him, he was able to send out hundreds of men to the woman's house, some traveling from other states. L.M. said she spent a lot of her time looking through Craigslist ads to find the ones he posted and flag them.

She said she had to install cameras and security gates to her farm in Virginia and also had to post signs telling the men they were not welcomed.

Police often had to get involved to "chase away the men who were enticed by the personal ads."

After reviewing Kuban's work computer and material they gathered from the Craigslist ads they were able to identify him as the one posting the ads. 

If he is convicted of the charge, he faces a maximum of five years in prison.

Sources: The Smoking Gun, Gawker