Society

Facebook Apologizes To Father After Rejecting Picture Of Infant Son Who Needs A Heart

| by Dominic Kelly

Earlier this week, Opposing Views reported that Facebook rejected a picture of an infant in need of a heart transplant, calling it “negative.” Now, the infant’s father is happy because the social media website offered an apology and a large advertising credit.

46-year-old Kevin Bond posted a picture of his son in the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit at Duke Children’s Hospital in Durham, North Carolina, in the hopes that it would help them raise awareness so he could get a heart transplant. Bond tried to pay for a Facebook ad, only spending $20, so that he could give their story more visibility, but Facebook rejected it, saying that his photo violated their standards.

“Reason(s): Your ad wasn't approved because the image or video thumbnail is scary, gory, or sensational and evokes a negative response. Images including accidents, car crashes, dead and dismembered bodies, ghosts, zombies, ghouls, and vampires are not allowed,” the response from the website said.

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“It hurt our whole family,” Bond said. “Nobody wants their beautiful son compared to ghosts, zombie ghouls, dismembered bodies, and vampires, and whatever else that rejection letter said.”

After his story went viral, Bond says donations came in from all over, and now, Facebook has offered him an apology as well as a $10,000 advertising credit to help spread even more awareness.

“This was a mistake on our part, and the ad has been re-approved,” read the apology from Facebook. “We apologize for any inconvenience this caused the family.”

Bond says he is overwhelmed by the response he’s gotten since he told his story.

“I would have never imagined this happening," said Bond. "When I posted the Facebook response, never did I think it would get this much attention."

Bond says they are still looking for the donor heart, but hopefully the large advertising credit from Facebook will help them get one soon.

Sources: NY Daily News, WPXI