Society

'When May I Shoot a Student?' Asks Boise State University Professor

| by Michael Allen

Greg Hampikian, a biology and criminal justice professor at Boise State University, recently asked state lawmakers when he should be allowed to shoot a student.

In an op-ed in The New York Times on Thursday, Hampikian questioned a proposed Idaho bill that would allow the concealed carry of guns on college campuses.

Hampikian wrote that the campus murder rate is "zero at present," but proposed hypothetical situations if the bill were to become law.

"I assume that if a student shoots first, I am allowed to empty my clip; but given the velocity of firearms, and my aging reflexes, I’d like to be proactive," Hampikian wrote. "For example, if I am working out a long equation on the board and several students try to correct me using their laser sights, am I allowed to fire a warning shot? If two armed students are arguing over who should be served next at the coffee bar and I sense escalating hostility, should I aim for the legs and remind them of the campus Shared-Values Statement (which reads, in part, 'Boise State strives to provide a culture of civility and success where all feel safe and free from discrimination, harassment, threats or intimidation')?"

Earlier this month, a report by Moms Demand Action and Mayors Against Illegal Guns showed that 16 of the 44 school shootings since the 2012 Sandy School shooting have happened at a college or university, noted TalkingPointsMemo.com.

Sources: The New York Times and TalkingPointsMemo.com