Society

School Bans Footballs, Baseballs, Lacrosse Balls, Games Of Tag, Cartwheels (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Weber Middle School in Port Washington, N.Y. is so worried about students being injured during recess that it has banned almost every conceivable fun activity that children have enjoyed for decades.

School officials have banned footballs, baseballs and lacrosse balls. Kids are not even allowed to play tag or do cartwheels unless they are supervised by a teacher.

“I think we need the soccer balls, the footballs and everything, so we can have some fun,” one student told CBS New York (video below).

Another student added, “Cartwheels and tag, I think it’s ridiculous they are banning that.”

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“That’s all we want to do, We’re in school all day sitting behind the desk learning,” said a third student.

“Some of these injuries can unintentionally become very serious, so we want to make sure our children have fun, but are also protected,” said Port Washington schools Supt. Kathleen Maloney.

"What we've noticed is that we've had a lot of kids in the nurse's office because of being inadvertently hit... Sometimes when they participate in tag they use the opportunity to give an extra push," Weber Assistant Principal Matthew Swinson told Patch.com.

However, some parents say it's actually about the school's fear of lawsuits.

Apparently this "safety trend" is spreading, as several districts are contacting the Port Washington district on how to ban fun for kids.

The Port Washington district is going to allow soft Nerf foam balls, which could still cause an injury if it hits the eye hard enough.

The school did not address the nationwide childhood obesity problem (due to a lack of exercise and poor diet), which is resulting in skyrocketing cases of diabetes, noted the Center for Disease Control.

Sources: Patch.com, CBS New York, Center for Disease Control