Politics

Mitt Romney Tells College Grads to Marry Young, Start Having Babies (Video)

| by Michael Allen
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During his commencement speech at Southern Virginia University over the weekend, former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney told graduates to "get married, have a quiver full of kids if you can" (video below), reports Mother Jones.

“Some people could marry, but choose to take more time, they say, for themselves. Others plan to wait until they’re well into their 30s or 40s until they think about getting married,” said Romney. “They’re going to miss so much of living, I’m afraid. If you meet a person you love, get married. Have a quiver full of kids if you can.”

However, Romney did not tell his largely-Mormon audience that the average student debt is almost $27,000 upon graduation.

According to CNN, the Institute for College Access & Success' Project on Student Debt polled 1,057 colleges and found that the average student debt was $26,600.

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The U.S. Department of Education reported in 2012 that the percentage of borrowers who defaulted on their federal student loans within two years of their first payment was 9.1%.

Romney is not the only one advising young people to get married young. Karen Swallow Prior, a professor of English at Liberty University (also in Lynchburg, Virginia) recently wrote an article for The Atlantic advising young people to get married early.

After admitting "delayed marriage does have economic benefits for college educated women and is credited with bringing down the overall divorce rate," Prior recalled how wonderful her marriage was in the early years when she and her husband were broke:

We were poor in those early years. Not food stamps poor, but poor enough to be given groceries by our church without having asked. The church gave us $200 once, too (which is exactly what that second Pacer cost). We held down terrible jobs and then got better ones.

Sources: Mother Jones, CNN, The Atlantic