Society

Connecticut School Teaches Second Amendment Doesn't Include Private Gun Ownership

| by Michael Allen
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Steven Boibeaux is furious that his son's middle school class was allegedly taught that Americans don’t have a Second Amendment right to bear arms.

Boibeaux's son is an eighth grader at Northeast Middle School in Bristol, Connecticut.

According to FoxNews.com, the boy's social studies teacher gave students a worksheet that stated: “The courts have consistently determined that the Second Amendment does not ensure each individual the right to bear arms. The courts have never found a law regulating the private ownership of weapons unconstitutional."

However, in 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a ban against guns in Washington D.C., reported NPR. A 5-4 ruling was in favor of a security guard who sued the city for not allowing him to keep his handgun at home.

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At the time, in Washington D.C., carrying an unregistered firearm and the registration of handguns were prohibited in order to curb gun violence. The U.S. Supreme Court said the ban violated the constitutional right to bear arms.

Instructional Fair published the worksheet also said: “The rights of this amendment are not extended to the individual citizens of the states. So a person has no right to complain about a Second Amendment violation by state laws.”

The worksheet concluded that the "militia" referred to in the Second Amendment “only provides the right of a state to keep an armed National Guard.”

“I am appalled,” Boibeaux told FoxNews.com. “It sounds to me like they are trying to indoctrinate our kids. I’m more than a little upset about this. It’s not up to the teacher to determine what the Constitution means.”

“I just don’t appreciate this as a parent. I expect teachers to teach my kids and tell the truth, not what they think their point of view is.”

“It is no longer an assignment in that particular school,” said Ellen Solek, the superintendent of the school district, adding it was an “administration decision in the best interest of the district.”

Sources: FoxNews.com and NPR