Society

Woman Claims Police Used Deadly Force, Killed Her Sister Over Drug Bag (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Lesa Suratt died in Aug. 2013 after a struggle with police officers in Sherman, Tx.

Suratt's sister Linda filed a lawsuit in June against the Sherman Police Department for allegedly using excessive and deadly force in her sister's death.

KXII recently broadcast part of a police dashcam video (below) of the incident that cost Suratt her life.

Suratt was pulled over for a traffic stop, handcuffed and placed in the back of a police car with her passenger. At some point, Suratt was able to free one hand and place a small bag of drugs in her mouth in an apparent attempt to swallow the evidence.

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The police officers returned to the cruiser, noticed Suratt had something in her mouth and fought to open her mouth.

According to a report by the Texas Rangers, the officers applied pressure on Suratt's jaw and neck.

However, Linda claims in her lawsuit that police officers repeatedly hit her sister with an open fist and flashlight in an effort to get the bag. The lawsuit also claims that an officer pushed his flashlight against Suratt's throat.

The lawsuit says police eventually pulled Suratt out of the cruiser and onto the pavement where one officer told another cop to "tase the bitch," which police did, notes the Houston Chronicle.

Linda says that police didn't call paramedics for 20 minutes.

Surratt later died at a local hospital, and an autopsy said she died from asphyxiation (not being able to breath).

"The actions of our officers were investigated by an outside agency, the Texas Rangers," Sherman Police Chief Otis Henry told KXII. "The results of their investigation were presented to a Grand Jury and they reviewed the evidence and investigation, and they determined there was no wrongdoing."

Sources: KXII, Houston Chronicle