Drug Law

Brothers Die After Overdosing At A House Party

| by Amanda Andrade-Rhoades

Brothers Nick and Jack Savage, 21 and 18 respectively, are dead after they both apparently overdosed on drugs following a party in Granger, Indiana.

The brothers died of a suspected drug and alcohol overdose on the morning of June 14.

Two other young men nearly died after they attended the same party in an upscale neighborhood, but they’re expected to survive.

Around 1:30 a.m., someone called for help when it appeared one of the party’s attendees overdosed on drugs. That victim is expected to survive. "Luckily, there was a doctor who lived in the neighborhood who was able to assist medics and revive the party,” Tim Corbett, the Metro Homicide Unit's commander, told the South Bend Tribune.

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Though the brothers made it home from the party, they fell asleep and never woke up. While officers were interviewing party attendees about their deaths, they learned about another young man who had taken the same drugs. Police officers were able to find him while he was exhibiting symptoms of an overdose, but still alive. 

"If not for the officers, that kid could be dead right now," county prosecutor Ken Cotter said.

It’s not clear what kind of drugs were at the party and investigators are waiting for the results of toxicology tests.

"At this point, it appears to be prescription drugs," said County Sheriff Mike Grzegorek. "Obviously, if the prescription doesn't belong to you, you shouldn't be taking it. You don't know what the effects are on you.”

Cotter said he’ll decide to file charges after the investigation is concluded. "There are two kids who are dead," he said. "It's going to be investigated the way it should be.”

Corbett added: "I'm sure there are going to be a lot of people shaking their heads, saying, 'I didn't think it would happen here’… This happens in $5 million houses and $50 houses. No one is immune to this."

Both brothers were former hockey players at Penn High School. Nick was a sophomore at Indiana University.

Sources: WSBT, South Bend Tribune Image via WSBT