Police And Citizen Help Save Woman's Life (Video)

| by Sarah Zimmerman
Woman and officers perform CPRWoman and officers perform CPR

A dash cam video (below) shows the teamwork between a Good Samaritan and a cop to help save the life of a woman who went into cardiac arrest and crashed her car.

Thandie Duval was in downtown Houston when she noticed a minor accident in which a car had crashed into the sidewalk, according to KTRK. She thought it was odd, however, that no driver emerged from the vehicle. When she peered inside, she saw that the driver was unconscious and turning blue. 

She tried to open the woman's door, but noticed it was locked. That's when she flagged down police, who had to break the window in order to get the driver out of the car.

"She was cold and blue in the face," said Deputy Eric Guerrero to KTRK.

Duval, a flight attendant trained in CPR, kicked into emergency response mode and immediately began performing CPR on the woman.

"When we pulled up, she literally had already passed away," said Duval. "Every year, [flight attendants] get re-certified and it's not just in coffee and tea."

She and the officers took turns performing CPR, with Duval giving instructions. The woman, on the brink of death, was revived after five minutes and was rushed to the hospital.

"I relieved [Duval] and I had another deputy relieve me and we just kept going [with CPR] until fire/EMS got there," Deputy Jeff Bartee explained to KTRK.

Those five minutes of CPR is why the woman, 27-year-old Ebony Ivory, is alive today. The officers who responded to the scene were not required to perform or know CPR. 

"It's our job. That's what we're supposed to do. Save lives, not take them," said Deputy Michael Colunga.

Duval, who was crucial in Ivory's rescue, refuses to take all the credit.

"It was a collective thing because you cannot do these things on your own. We were at the right place at the right time," she said.

Nonetheless, the Association of Flight Attendants took to Facebook to congratulate Duval on a job well done. "We are aviation's first responders," the Association wrote. "Proud of AFA Council 42 Member Thandie Duval."

Ivory's sister reports to KTRK that she remains hospitalized and that her family is grateful to the hard work of Duval and the officers. 

Sources: KTRK, Association of Flight Attendants/Facebook / Photo credit: KTRK via Daily Mail

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