As George Zimmerman’s trial continues, more conflicting and confusing eye-witness reports have surfaced in the testimony, which may likely make it more difficult for the prosecution to achieve a second-degree murder charge.

Most recently, Jonathan Good, a former resident at the townhouse complex 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was killed in front of, testified in front of the jury that he saw Martin straddling Zimmerman during the struggle, which places him in a more offensive position.

Yet, according to Zimmerman and the defense, Martin repeatedly smashed Zimmerman’s head into the concrete, which is a claim Good said he could not confirm.

“I did not see that," Good responded after he was asked by a state prosecutor about Zimmerman’s version of the events. The opening arguments for the defense heavily rely on Martin using the concrete as a deadly weapon, since the teenager was unarmed during the encounter.

Good is the fourth partial witness and former neighbor from the gated community to testify in the trial, and the first to claim he saw Martin on top of Zimmerman in the heated struggle.

Zimmerman, 29, confronted Martin late one night while he was walking to a friend’s house in the gated community and accused him of suspicious behavior. Civil rights groups have since accused Zimmerman of racial profiling since the teen wasn’t doing anything suspicious other than walking on the sidewalk with his hood up.

Allegedly, a fight broke out between the two and Zimmerman ended up shooting Martin in the chest. Zimmerman claims Martin repeatedly slammed his head against the concrete and yelled death threats during the attack, which prompted Zimmerman to act in self-defense.

Florida’s Stand Your Ground law allows people to use deadly force if they feel their lives are in danger, which has provided legal cover for Zimmerman who claims the encounter falls under that law.

In order to convict Zimmerman, the jury must find that Zimmerman acted in “ill will” or with “indifference to human life,” which will be a challenge for the prosecution because of the hazy circumstances and witness accounts.

Sources: Reuters, Los Angeles Times