University of Arkansas Tells Students To ‘Glance’ Or ‘Nod’ To Prevent Attacks

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Students at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock have been advised that if they encounter a dangerous situation on campus, they should defend themselves by glancing and nodding.

The Arkansas Legislature approved a concealed gun carry law, but most Arkansas universities  including the University of Arkansas and Arkansas State University  were given the option to opt out and decided to ban concealed firearms.   

According to a chain of emails sent between UALR staff members, this has left students and staff members vulnerable to attack. One faculty member, a professor of biology, was assaulted by three teenagers in a parking lot off campus.

“I had not gone very far before I was attacked from behind by two of them and received a number of blows to the back of my head,” wrote the professor in an email. “Given the proximity to this campus and the fact that a number of our students, faculty and staff walk through this very same area on both a daily and nightly basis, I felt it prudent to share this info with you and to advise you to be on your guard while in the vicinity.”

Another faculty answered the email and said a student had been attacked in the same area, The Daily Caller reported.

Sharon Houlette, a detective with the Department of Public Safety at UALR, responded by giving her advice about how to avoid being attacked.

“A glance or a nod will help you show anyone who might think that you are not paying attention, and you are aware of their presence,” she wrote.

The full list of safety tips from the UALR Department of Public Safety is below:

1. “Always pay attention to your surroundings.”

2. “Glance or a nod” which will “help you show anyone who might think that you are not paying attention, and you are aware of their presence.”

3. Attend a complimentary “Crime Prevention presentation or workshop!”

4. Park on campus and use the trolley service to get to class so as to reduce the potential attack time.

Sources: The Daily Caller, The Arkansas Project