Society

Town Fights To Keep McDonald's Out, Fast Food Chain Claims Community Support

| by Michael Allen
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McDonald’s is trying to build a restaurant in Tecoma, a tiny suburb in Melbourne, Australia.

However, the fast food giant has faced numerous protesters, including a 24-year-old student, who blocked a construction crew for seven freezing days (it’s winter down under), noted The Age.

The protester (pictured) was recently arrested and removed by 50 police officers acting on behalf of the U.S. corporation.

Tecoma has a population of 2,000 and is located within the beautiful Dandenong Ranges, which includes small mountains.

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

According to the anti-McDonald’s web site BurgerOff.org, “1,170 written objections were directed at the local [city] council.”

Those objections included: “concerns relating to traffic, litter, noise, crime, impact on existing local businesses, locality opposite a primary and preschool, proximity within 1 kilometre of a National Park.”

The Tecoma City Council unanimously passed a law banning McDonald’s from the area, but the corporation appealed and won via the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT), reported The Guardian.

In response to the controversy, Skye Oxenham, a McDonald’s Australia spokeswoman, told The Herald Sun: “We have a great franchisee from the area who is about to create 100 local jobs, provide accredited training and work experience ... We’re ready to get on with it and know there is much support from within the community.”

Apparently the “support” is so great that McDonald’s must hire private security guards, in addition to calling police on local citizens.

Local protesters have raised $30,000 to personally deliver a petition to McDonald’s corporate headquarters in Chicago.

Sources: The Age, BurgerOff.org, The Guardian, The Herald Sun