Crime

Squatter Steals $300,000 In Artwork From Million Dollar Mansion

| by James Brannigan
A man sold over $300,000 worth of stolen artwork on social media and to pawn shops; artwork taken from a home he was illegally squatting in.A man sold over $300,000 worth of stolen artwork on social media and to pawn shops; artwork taken from a home he was illegally squatting in.

A squatter in San Francisco has been arrested for stealing and selling artwork from a multi-million dollar mansion, ABC News reports.

The man, who has been identified as 39-year-old Jeremiah Henry Kaylor, had been squatting in the residence for at least two months. He was caught on Oct. 17, when a neighbor called the police around 11 p.m.

"They made contact with the squatter, he identified himself, produced paperwork saying that he was going to be the proprietor of the house and was in the process of owning the home," Officer Carlos Manfredi, a spokesman for the San Francisco Police Department, told ABC News.

The officers came back the next day and arrested Kaylor after talking to the real estate agent who said that no such deal was in place.

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When Kaylor was leaving he tried to take a wooden shipping crate with him, claiming the items inside were junk and belonged to him. Insider the crate, officers found one of the paintings from the home and arrested Kaylor.

At the police station Kaylor admitted to selling several of the paintings via Facebook and at pawn shops. In total, 11 paintings were missing from the house, 9 of which have been recovered.

This isn't the first time a squatter has been caught in a million dollar mansion. In December of last year a couple was arrested in Keystone Heights, Florida, after attempting to take over a foreclosed mansion.

USA Today reports that Justin and Jenna Dean claimed the mansion for themselves and changed the locks on the home. They then filed fraudulent paperwork claiming that the house was theirs. They were caught when Ameris Bank, owner of the home, legally sold the mansion to another couple. 

Along with the forged paperwork, Clay County officials were able to build their case against the couple using social media pictures that the two had posted.

Source ABC Local News, CBS Local News, USA Today Photo Credit CBS Local News