Society

Trayvon Martin's Parents Settle Wrongful Death Suit With Homeowners Association

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht
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The parents of Trayvon Martin, the teen shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer last year, have settled a wrongful death claim they brought against the homeowners association of the Florida subdivision of Sanford.

The Orlando Sentinel reports the family’s claim is believed to be at least $1 million, but their attorney, Benjamin Crump, refused to confirm that amount.

"I have no comment on that subject...I know you did not get that from me,” Crump said.

Paperwork on the claim was filed at the Seminole County Courthouse, and a portion was made viewable to the public on Friday.

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Martin was fatally shot near his father’s home at the Retreat at Twin Lakes townhomes in Sanford on Feb. 26, 2012, by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer who claimed he shot in self defense.

The paperwork makes it clear that the settlement does not include Zimmerman. The family says they still intend to seek damages from him.

The settlement does not mean the homeowners association is guilty of any wrongdoing or has admitted liability.

"It is understood and agreed that the payment made herein is not to be construed as an admission of any liability by or on behalf of the releasing parties; but instead the monies being paid hereunder is consideration for avoiding litigation, the uncertainties stemming from litigation as well as to protect and secure the good name and good will of the released parties," the settlement states.

Zimmerman’s attorney, Mark O’Mara said in February that Trayvon’s parents attempted to settle, but they rejected an offer of $1 million from the association or its insurer, Travelers Casualty and Surety Co. of America.

"Travelers is not a party to the settlement," Travelers said in a statement. "The settlement would have been with other insurers of the homeowners association and/or the property managers."

Sources: ABC News, Orlando Sentinel