Oklahoma Plans Double Execution, Won't Reveal Source of Lethal Drugs

| by Michael Allen

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (R) announced today that the state is planning a double execution, which has not happened in about 80 years.

The inmates to be executed, Clayton Lockett and Charles Warner, recently lost a decision in the Oklahoma State Supreme Court, noted the Associated Press.

Lockett and Warner sued to know the source of the drug(s) that will be used to put them to death, but the state's high court ruled the men do not have the right to know.

"The defendants had their day in court," said Gov. Fallin. "The court has made a decision. Two men that do not contest their guilt in heinous murders will now face justice, and the families and friends of their victims will now have closure."

While Governor Fallin supports not revealing the source of execution drugs, she demanded transparency from the state's Pardon and Parole Board, reported the Associated Press in 2012.

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections is planning the mens' double execution for April 29, which has not happened since June 11, 1937.

"It's not even known whether the lethal injection drugs to be used were obtained legally, and nothing is known about their source, purity, or efficacy, among other questions," Seth Day, an attorney for Lockett and Warner, said in a statement. "Oklahoma's extreme secrecy surrounding lethal injection undermines our courts and democracy."

According to the ABA Journal, Oklahoma's law states, "The identity of all persons who participate in or administer the execution process and persons who supply the drugs, medical supplies or medical equipment for the execution shall be confidential and shall not be subject to discovery in any civil or criminal proceedings."

That law was struck down last month by Oklahoma County District Judge Patricia Parrish, but the State Supreme Court upheld the law, noted The Oklahoman.

Lockett was convicted of shooting Stephanie Nieman, 19, in 1999. Warner was convicted of raping and killing his girlfriend's 11-month-old baby in 1997.

Sources: Associated Press, ABA Journal, The Oklahoman