Crime

Father Who Killed Baby Made Frightening Online Searches

| by Sean Kelly
Kaliq Mansour And ByranKaliq Mansour And Byran

The Oregon Court of Appeals overturned the conviction of a man who was serving a life sentence for the death of his 11-week-old son.

The conviction of Kaliq Mansor was overturned because the search warrant that authorized the investigation of his internet searches was too broad. The Google searches, included “newborn abuse,” “Oregon child abuse laws,” “afraid of abusing my baby” and “father hates infant.”

The searches were made up to three days before Mansor called 911 to reported that his son, Bryan, was not breathing. The infant died two days after he was taken to the hospital, dying from injuries that included a fractured skill, rib fracture and retinal hemorrhages. His twin brother also had retinal hemorrhaging and a broken rib. 

The twin survived and is due to start kindergarten soon, reports The Oregonian.

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The arrest came in 2011, and Mansor was charged with murder, murder by abuse, first- and third-degree assault and first-degree criminal mistreatment. The 38-year-old was sentenced to life in prison in October 2012. 

Mansor’s ex-wife, Angela Foster, told The Oregonian she disagreed with the appeals court’s decision to overturn the murder conviction.

“I'm completely heartbroken and saddened by today's ruling,” she said. “I hope that in the end justice will prevail and that Mr. Mansor will remain in prison, where he belongs, for the rest of his life."

The court’s decision sparked controversy, with many readers believing he should have remained in prison.

“It looks like justice will prevail in this case, but it's not in the lead at the moment,” one Daily Mail reader commented.

Another reader said that better evidence was needed to prove his guilt, even though the Google searches seemed to be incriminating.

“The police will simply have to find better evidence to prove his guilt ... if he is guilty ... which at the moment he is not -- like it or not, we must respect the rule of law -- lest we be at the receiving end of a miscarriage of justice,” the reader commented.

Sources: Daily Mail, The Oregonian / Photo credit: Daily Mail 

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