Society

Informant In Murder Case Suing Victim's Father For Not Providing $250,000 Reward

| by Will Hagle

A St. Louis businessman offered a $250,000 reward for information regarding the murder of his son. When a John Doe responded to the ad for the reward, which was placed in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and announced on two local television stations, he informed the businessman, Seymore Raiffie, that his son’s murderer was William McNeil.

McNeil subsequently “pleaded guilty to second-degree murder, three counts of armed criminal action, first-degree assault and first-degree robbery,” according to Court House News. Doe, however, never received his reward.

Doe has filed a lawsuit against Raiffie and his business, Dynamic Vending, claiming that he deserves to receive the $250,000 reward promised to him in the ads. The official complaints explains that the information provided by Doe directly led to the arrest of McNeil.

"Because said unilateral offer was made by defendant Raiffie as previously indicated, plaintiff was induced and had the capacity to accept, and in fact did accept said offer by providing crucial information to the proper authorities which broke open this cold case and led to the arrest and eventual conviction of William McNeil for the murder of defendant's son, Mark Raiffie,” the complaint reads.

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The complaint also explains that the Doe suing Raiffie and Dynamic Vending risked his life in order to provide the information and receive the reward. 

"By providing said information, plaintiff has received death threats and is subject to further prejudice, harassments, emotional distress, threats, physical harm, bodily injury or even death as retaliation for his acceptance of defendant's reward offer," another section of the complaint reads. 

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the murder of Raiffie’s 47-year-old son Mark occurred at Raiffie’s business on May 24th, 1999. The informant tipped off McNeil’s involvement in 2011 after viewing the ads regarding the award.