Crime

Family Claims Botched NYPD Raid Caused Carlos Alcis’ Fatal Heart Attack

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht
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The Brooklyn District Attorney is launching an investigation into a bungled New York Police Department raid after a Brooklyn family claimed their father, Carlos Alcis, suffered a fatal heart attack after the police entered their home without a warrant.

Alcis, 43, died Thursday morning after police officers entered his home while searching for a suspect who punched a woman in the street and stole her phone. NYPD was alerted that the man ran into the building, and they began knocking on doors.

Police claim Alcis let them into his apartment, but his family insists that NYPD barged in, intruding on their privacy in the early morning. Under that kind of duress, the family believes that’s why Alcis suffered a heart attack in the first place, according to WABC-TV.

"When we woke up there were flashlights in our faces. We saw 10 police officers in the basement," said Imanuel Alcis, the victim's son.

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Two of Alcis’ sons were questioned by police, but were not charged with any crime.

"Blood come out from my brother's mouth,” said the victim’s brother, Rudy Alcis. “That's when they came over to my nephew to ask him to give him mouth to mouth.”

Contrary to police reports, Imanuel Alcis said an officer began pumping on his father’s heart and asked him to administer CPR.

“With more than 10 police officers inside the house, my nephew here had to call 911 for my brother,” Rudy Alcis told NY1. “And when paramedics arrived, they tell them, ‘Sorry for the loss.’”

It took 20 minutes for help to arrive. The ambulance company that responded to the call, Uniformed Paramedics, told WABC-TV that they were originally given the wrong address for the Alcis home.

"What happened, what's going on? Is that legal to go in somebody's house without a warrant?” Rudy Alcis asked WABC-TV.

Police experts told WABC-TV that searching a home without a warrant is only permissible if the police are in fresh pursuit of a suspect committing a felony crime or posing serious danger like a hostage situation. Experts said neither were present in this incident.

"Everyone in the apartment sleeping. No idea how police gained entrance. No one gave permission to police to enter," said family attorney Sanford Rubenstein.

The NYPD arrested the suspect, 16-year-old Stephon Foster, on Friday. He lives in Alcis’ building, but had nothing to do with the family.

Sources: Raw Story, WABC-TV