Society

Facebook Posting Helps Solve Hit-And-Run Case From 1968

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The mystery of who struck and killed a 4-year-old in upstate New York back in 1968 has been solved thanks to a Facebook posting. 62-year-old Douglas Parkhurst has been identified as the driver of the car that killed Carolee Saide Ashby on Halloween night 45 years ago. Parkhurst will not be charged because the statute of limitations has expired.

A former resident of Fulton, N.Y., the town where the crime occurred, was reading a retired detective’s Facebook post about the case. Now living in Florida, the woman recalled that shortly after the incident happened a member of Parkhurst’s family asked her to say that she was with Parkhurst on Halloween night. She refused the request.

After the Facebook post jogged her memory, the woman called the Fulton police and gave them Parkhurst’s name.

Parkhurst was interviewed about the hit-and-run after it happened but somehow managed to avoid being charged even after he admitted to police that he had been in an accident. He apparently told police that he struck a guard post with his 1962 Buick.

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The elderly man has now confessed that he was drinking that night and said that he knew he hit something but thought it was an animal. He never stopped to see what he hit, CBS News reported.

Carolee's sister, Darlene McCann, is upset that Parkhurst will not face any repercussions for killing her sister.

"I know some things people have been far more accountable for more than this man just being able to hide out, live with his family and enjoy it. We didn't get to do that," McCann said.

Carolee's mother, Marlene Ashby, said that she would accept an apology from Parkhurst but doesn’t expect that it will give her a sense of closure.

"How can he be sorry? I know you live with guilt and all that - you should live with something but to feel sorry now for what he did - it doesn't even matter to me that much," Ashby said.

Sources: CBS News, WTVH