Crime

Anonymous to Partner with Sexual Violence Awareness Groups To Teach Rape Prevention in School?

Several sexual violence awareness groups in Ohio would consider partnering with hacktivist group Anonymous to teach rape prevention in schools, reports Mother Jones.

Anonymous hacked the fan website for the Steubenville, Ohio, football team back in December. Several players were charged with the August rape of a teen who was incapacitated by alcohol. One of the players convicted claimed he did not realize that putting a finger in the girl’s genitals was considered rape.

“If you don’t know that, that means you don’t get taught that,” said Anonymous spokesman @Master_of_Ceremonies (MC).

While the state of Ohio requires all high schools to offer a course on teen dating violence prevention, there is little funding. Some schools do not offer the instruction, according to Katie Hanna, the executive director of the Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence.

This led MC, who has no education or experience in sexual violence prevention, to propose a new program at Steubenville. In January, he got a female Anonymous member to contact the school about a new rape awareness class. The class would attempt to encourage students speak up about heinous crimes like rape, assault, and bullying.

The female Anon said she was told, "Our teachers are qualified and more than capable of teaching our students about rape, not people in masks, who go around terrorizing people.”  

MC says the important thing is to make offenders accountable for their actions. "As long as they think somebody is always watching," MC said, "that might deter some things."

Josh Harkinson of Mother Jones spoke to several groups that said they wouldn’t mind working with Anonymous to raise awareness on sexual violence. "We would be open to talking to them, certainly, yeah," said Hanna of the Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence.

MC admitted that Anonymous has no illusions that schools will welcome them into classrooms with open arms, but that doesn’t stop their intentions.

“I think it’s great that people want to get involved. That’s what we want,” Cox said.

Source: Mother Jones

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