Society

Albuquerque City Council Taken Over by Protesters (Video)

| by Michael Allen

About 40 activists took over an Albuquerque, N.M., City Council meeting last night.

Albuquerque City Council President Ken Sanchez stopped the meeting and city employees left the building as activists took over the City Hall chambers.

"This is no longer your meeting, this is the people’s meeting,” David Correia, an assistant professor at the University of New Mexico, yelled into a microphone.

Some protesters called for the arrest of Albuquerque Police Department (ADP) Chief Gordon Eden over several incidents of police brutality, including the killing of a homeless man.

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According to the Albuquerque Journal, Chief Eden quickly exited the building before anyone could take him into custody.

“You are walking away from justice,” Correia shouted at the chief as he scurried out.

The protesters voted unanimously on “no confidence” in Mayor Richard Berry and City Administrator Rob Perry.

The protesters' meeting lasted about 30 minutes and then dispersed without any violence, but was later condemned by the violence-prone ADP.

“We understand there are those in our community who have expressed concerns about APD issues related to the Department of Justice report,” ADP spokeswoman Janet Blair said in a statement.

“We are working hard to make proactive improvements now and in conjunction with DOJ recommendations," added Blair. "While we welcome constructive discussions, we do not believe disruption of tonight’s city council meeting was a productive way to meet those goals.”

The Washington Post reports that a recent U.S. Department of Justice investigation into the recent shootings by the ADP found “a pattern or practice of use of excessive force” and the ADP “used deadly force against people who posed a minimal threat, including individuals who posed a threat only to themselves or who were unarmed."

Sources: The Washington Post and Albuquerque Journal