College Accidentally Sends Out Hundreds of Letters Giving Students Full-Ride Scholarships

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A couple hundred high school seniors were disappointed to find out that a letter they received from Utah Valley University offering them a four-year scholarship was sent out by mistake.

The letter was sent to 300 high school seniors, and said they were offering to pay for their tuition for four years. Two weeks passed until the school revealed it was sent out by mistake.

Matthew Holland, university president, apologized for the confusion and disappointment and said they were sent out because of a technical glitch.

Holland also said they are waiving a February 1 scholarship deadline so students who received the letter can apply for scholarships.

Usually, the award goes to students who received high ACT scores and GPAs, but the technical glitch meant that only ACT scores were considered.

Chris Taylor, university spokesman, said once officials noticed the mistake they sent out letters apologizing for it.

But the original letter left many seniors excited and honored to be awarded the scholarship. Many told their families and celebrated the award.

Seniors Sarah Payne and Lisa Schneider were two of the 300 who received the letter.

The letter read: I want to extend a personal invitation to you to consider Utah Valley University as your higher education destination of choice. As a result of your stellar academic performance in high school, I’m thrilled to extend the offer of an Exemplary Scholarship, a four-year full tuition award.”

The letter also encouraged students to apply for the Presidential Scholarship, an award that pays for students’ books and fees. It also extended an invitation for the students to attend a banquet honoring them.

“I honestly was shocked because I hadn’t even applied to UVU and I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, they’re offering me this scholarship to go to school for free,” Schneider said.

Both Schneider and her friend Payne received the letter and told their family and friends. They then decided to attend the school.

They immediately applied, but were disappointed to receive a letter soon after stating they sent the scholarship letter by accident.

Schneider called the school and asked if she could apply for a scholarship, but the administration told her it was too late.

Now the girls are focusing on getting into other schools. Payne wants to get into either Utah State University or Brigham Young University.

Schneider is still considering UVU, but her top choice is BYU.