The Closing of HAARP Still Leaves Conspiracy Theorists Wondering and Modern Day Survivalists Prepping

| by Will Hagle

Where there is government, there is conspiracy. And for good reason. Given the secret nature in which the U.S. government and military operates, they have been a favorite target for theorists throughout the past century. From Bush’s involvement in 9/11 to Area 51, which the CIA finally acknowledged last year, theories are constantly abound about the government’s secret efforts at manipulating and controlling the public.

The latest news to energize government skeptics surrounds the U.S. Air Force’s closing of HAARP, a research facility in Gakona, Alaska, designed to analyze the ionosphere. HAARP, which stands for High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program, sends radio signals to the region of the upper atmosphere in order to study its responses for use in radio transmission. According to NBC News, the project cost more than $290 million to build. Adjusting the site’s generators and equipment to meet environmental standards required by the Clean Air Act would prove too costly for the project to continue.

David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, claimed  in a Senate hearing regarding the site’s closure that HAARP’s purpose had been fulfilled and that the military could now study the ionosphere using less costly methods.

“We’re moving on to other ways of managing the ionosphere, which the HAARP was really designed to do,” he said, according to Alaska Dispatch News. “To inject energy into the ionosphere to be able to actually control it. But that work has been completed.”

If natural disasters suddenly stop occurring, the ideas proposed by HAARP conspiracy theorists may have merit. The project has been blamed in conspiracy theorist circles online and elsewhere for nearly all of the natural disasters that have impacted the Earth in recent years, from the 2011 tsunami in Japan to the devastating Oklahoma tornado in 2013. Even former President of Venezuela Hugo Chavez blamed HAARP for influencing weather patterns, accusing the site of causing the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

Regardless of whether the arguments against HAARP’s control over weather and the environment have any merit, natural disasters have certainly been increasing. According to a study by the Norwegian Refugee Council, natural disasters displaced three times as many people as war in 2013. A report from the New England Journal of Medicine found natural disasters have affected an average of 217 million people each year since 1990.

The Guardian cites mass migration from country to cities as part of the problem. As cities become crowded and overpopulated, they are less able to adequately respond to natural disasters. That phenomenon should be familiar to residents of San Francisco, who have been dreadfully anticipating the “Big One,” a mega-earthquake expected to hit California’s coast, for decades. As a result of natural disasters increasing, the concept of survivalism has become popular.

A handful of companies are attempting to help people who are worried about societal collapse or environmental destruction. National Geographic Channel’s Doomsday Preppers is a reality series that profiles those who are preparing for the downfall of civilization.

Food4Patriots is one such organization. The company sells pre-packaged kits of dehydrated food, designed to have a shelf life of at least 25 years. The Nashville, Tennessee-based group packs its survival kits in easy-to-store boxes, making them ideal in the long and short term.

In describing the company’s approach, explained that survival preparedness is a logical choice that consumers can make. Purchasing and storing a kit is easier than building a Blast from the Past-esque bomb shelter, and it could have a highly beneficial payoff should any sort of disaster occur.

"There are many things that people can do to prepare for a disaster, depending on their time and budget, from putting together a 72-hour survival kit to building a fully-stocked shelter where they could live for months with their family,” a representative from Food4Patriots told Opposing Views. “Probably just about anybody can do the former, while very few could arrange for the latter, so the key is to find an affordable middle-ground solution to dealing with the inevitable disaster."

Although HAARP is closing, it is unlikely that mass global disasters will suddenly end. The scarier truth is that we don’t exactly know what is responsible. It could b HAARP. It could be anything, really. Until we know what exactly is causing these events, survivalism may be the only option.