Society

Chelsea Manning Sent To Solitary Confinement After Suicide Attempt

| by Nik Bonopartis
Chelsea Manning as Bradley Manning in an undated U.S. Army photograph.Chelsea Manning as Bradley Manning in an undated U.S. Army photograph.

Bradley Manning, the former U.S. Army private now known as Chelsea Manning, has been sentenced to 14 days in solitary confinement after a suicide attempt in July.

Manning is serving a 35-year prison sentence in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, after he was convicted of violating the Espionage Act and stealing government property in 2013.

Like fellow whistleblower Edward Snowden, who fled to Russia where he received political asylum, Manning leaked a trove of documents to the organization WikiLeaks, including several hundred thousand military reports and diplomatic cables, along with videos of several controversial U.S. airstrikes.

Manning was hospitalized and charged with three counts of misconduct for the suicide attempt, according to The Guardian. In a statement issued through the group Fight for the Future, Manning said the solitary confinement period is called "disciplinary segregation."

“I am feeling hurt," Manning said through the group. "I am feeling lonely. I am embarrassed by the decision. I don’t know how to explain it."

Manning operates a Twitter account under the handle @xychelsea, dictating tweets by phone to supporters who then tweet them out.

On Sept. 23, Manning's account had retweeted dozens of messages of support from journalists, celebrities, and other supporters.

"From her arrest to Quantico to Leavenworth and everything in-between, @xychelsea has stared down so much cruelty," ACLU attorney Chase Strangio tweeted. "Keep up the support."

Sources: The Guardian, Chase Strangio/Twitter, The Daily Beast / Photo credit: United States Army​ via Wikimedia Commons

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