Chaos As Chicago Cops Shoot Car Thief Suspect (Video)

| by Michael Allen
Chicago PoliceChicago Police

The Independent Police Review Authority released Chicago police video (below) from dashboard and body cameras on Aug. 5 that show officers shooting at a suspected car thief, Paul O'Neal, in a residential neighborhood on July 28.

Police fired at the young African-American man at least 15 times while he drove an allegedly stolen Jaguar convertible, but almost shot each other, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Moments later, after the Jaguar crashed into a police car, the officers chased the 18-year-old suspect on foot.

O'Neal made it into a backyard, but was repeatedly shot by an officer. The fatal shots are not seen on the video, but the audio was recorded by another officer who could not get over the fence into the backyard.

Chicago police have not disclosed why the actual shooting of O'Neal was not filmed by that officer's body camera.

In a video showing that aftermath of the shooting, the police cursed at O'Neal and handcuffed the dying man face down, reports CNN. One officer kept his foot on O'Neal's leg, while another held O'Neal by the head.

In the aftermath video, the officer who believed he fatally shot O'Neal recalled that O'Neal was shooting at him in the street, but those bullets actually came from his fellow officers, notes the Chicago Tribune.

The officer, who apparently shot O'Neal, admitted he didn't know if O'Neal was armed.

A sergeant tried to calm the distraught officer by telling him O'Neal had been driving a stolen car.

The Independent Police Review Authority released nine videos of the incident, which the head of the agency, Sharon Fairley, described as "shocking and disturbing."

Fairley added that the video recording is "not the only evidence to be gathered and analyzed when conducting a fair and thorough assessment of the conduct of police officers in performing their duties," reports CNN.

Authorities said O'Neal was unarmed and was shot in the back, which would seem to indicate he was fleeing the officer, not advancing or attacking.

Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson was shouted down by protesters when he tried to speak at a press conference on Aug. 5.

On Aug. 1, O'Neal's family filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the officers involved in the incident for allegedly firing on O'Neal "without lawful justification or excuse."

WARNING: Graphic video.

Sources: Chicago Tribune, CNN / Photo credit: Chicago Police Department via YouTube

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