Society

California Man Claims Comcast Got Him Fired From His Job

| by Khier Casino

A year-long billing dispute has been going on between Comcast and one of its customers. Now, the customer says he has been fired from his job after complaining about the cable company’s service.

A Northern California man named Conal O’Rourke complained to Comcast after he was charged for services and equipment he neither needed nor used, the Consumerist reports.

The company promised O’Rourke extra television channels after his complaint in October 2013, but allegedly sent him $1,820 worth of equipment he didn’t need and charged him for it.

“There were a few DVRs, modem, standard boxes and equipment that I was unfamiliar with,” he says.

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O’Rourke, who works as an accountant for PriceWaterhouseCoopers, a company that offers consulting services to Comcast, created a spreadsheet and sent it to the cable company to show them the overcharges he received, but they refused to reverse the error.

The issue escalated in February, when he contacted Comcast’s controller, the office that oversees the company accounts, Business Insider reports. O’Rourke said he repeatedly called them about his bill and told them that Comcast should be investigated by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

It went downhill from there, as the accounting firm where he worked reportedly terminated him after someone from Comcast contacted his employer.

After O’Rourke’s firing, Comcast provided the accounting firm with an email summarizing their conversations.

O’Rourke allegedly used the name of his employer during his calls with Comcast, which he denies. Instead, he claims someone working for cable company researched him and found out where he worked.

As a result of his termination, O’Rourke has hired a local attorney and is now considering suing Comcast if the company does not agree to his demands, which include "a full retraction and apology, his re-employment with his former employer, and $100,312.50" by October 14, he told Ars Technica in an interview.

Sources: ConsumeristBusiness Insider via Yahoo FinanceArs Technica

Image Credits: Mr.TinDCJeepersMedia/Flickr