Society

Brooklyn Nurse Will Be Filing Her Divorce Via Facebook Messaging

| by Arthur Kogan
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A Brooklyn nurse has officially been given legal approval from a judge to file her divorce papers through Facebook.

Ellanora Baidoo, 26, who will be changing her relationship status to "single," “is granted permission serve defendant with the divorce summons using a private message through Facebook,” with her lawyer messaging Victor Sena Blood-Dzraku through her account, Cooper wrote.

This is exactly what Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Matthew Cooper wrote in his March 27 decision:

[P]laintiff is granted permission to serve defendant with the divorce summons using a private message through Facebook. Specifically, because litigants are prohibited from serving other litigants, plaintiff's attorney shall log into plaintiff's Facebook account and message the defendant by first identifying himself, and then including either a web address of the summons or attaching an image of the summons. This transmittal shall be repeated by plaintiff's attorney to defendant once a week for three consecutive weeks or until acknowledged by the defendant. Additionally, after the initial transmittal, plaintiff and her attorney are to call and text message defendant to inform him that the summons for divorce has been sent to him via Facebook.

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 “I think it’s new law, and it’s necessary,” said Baidoo’s lawyer, Andrew Spinnell.

In this unique situation, Baidoo’s husband has simply been nowhere to be found. He vacated his apartment in 2011 and there is no other address on file ever since.

Baidoo “has spoken with defendant by telephone on occasion and he has told her that he has no fixed address and no place of employment. He has also refused to make himself available to be served with divorce papers.”

The “post office has no forwarding address for him, there is no billing address linked to his prepaid cell phone, and the Department of Motor Vehicles has no record of him,” the ruling says.

“We tried everything, including hiring a private detective — and nothing,” Spinnell said.

The first Facebook message has already been sent to Blood-Dzraku last week but Spinnell says he has not yet received a response.

Sources: New York Daily News  

Photo Source: Clip Art Best, Flickr