Society

British Pub in NYC Faces Human Rights Prosecution After Ad Asks for British Servers

| by
article imagearticle image

A British pub in New York is now facing a human rights prosecution and a fine after they advertised for wait staff on Craigslist, saying in the ad that "being British definitely works in your favor."

The owners said staff had to know why Liverpool v Everton is an important match, and know the meaning of Old Firm.

According to the New York City Commission on Human Rights, advertisements can not demand staff be a specific nationality. 

They have set up a "conciliation meeting" to talk with pub owners Jennifer and Michael Colbert. If a deal is not reached, there will be a trial and a fine.

Their advertisement was reported when a waitress from New Jersey was fired because she did not understand British humor.

Mr. Colbert is from Wrexham and his wife is an American.

They said, "[The fired waitress] was from New Jersey. The customers didn't take to her. She didn't understand when they were making jokes. There's a certain cadence to the sarcasm that just flew over her shoulders."

They fired her and then created the ad that asked for British servers.

In it, they also said they wanted "energetic and enthusiastic men and women with an appreciation of craft beer, good food, whisky and real football (aka soccer)."

The Colbert's are fighting claims that they have discriminated against Americans and have written a letter to the commission.

In it, they said that their working staff had to have knowledge of various British phrases and cuisine in order to best serve their customers.

Cliff Mulqeeun, the general counsel for the New York City Commission on Human Rights, said the Colbert's missed the point.

"There's an argument that someone who works in a Chinese restaurant, for example may need to speak Chinese in order to communicate with their co-workers. But there's a difference between saying you have to speak Chinese and saying you have to be Chinese," Mulqueen said.

Sources: Daily Mail, NY Times