Cop Tases Black Man For Not Giving Name (Video)

| by Michael Allen
Chardrick MitchellChardrick Mitchell

A body camera video (below) shows a police officer in Blytheville, Arkansas, using a taser on a black man for not providing him his name on July 4.

Chardrick Mitchell filed an excessive force lawsuit against the City of Blytheville, the police chief and the police officer, reported the Arkansas Times.

The lawsuit said Mitchell would not allow his ex-girlfriend inside his apartment to get her clothing, which she asserted was in there, so she called the police.

Officer Stephen Sigman arrived on the scene, and told Mitchell to let his ex remove her things apartment, according to the lawsuit.

On the body camera video, Sigman can be heard asking Mitchell for his name several times, which Mitchell refuses to do.

"You need to give me your name," Sigman says. "If you don't, I'm going to arrest you for obstruction."

Mitchell asks why he has to give his name, and Sigman replies with, "because I asked you to," before explaining he's working a case.

Mitchell and his ex have a verbal exchange before Sigman asks Mitchell once again for his name and Mitchell walks away.

Sigman aims his Taser at Mitchell and states, "Turn around, you're under arrest," and immediately fires the Taser into Mitchell's back; Mitchell collapses to the ground.

Mitchell's lawsuit, filed by his lawyer James Harris, states: "At no time did Mr. Mitchell resist arrest, especially since he had already been tased when he was first told he was under arrest, even though he had at that point committed no possible criminal act," notes the New York Daily News.

The lawsuit adds: "Video displays that the first time Officer Sigman told Mr. Mitchell that he was under arrest was either at the moment the tazer was fired or just as the tazer was striking Mr. Mitchell in the back."

The Blytheville Police Department would not comment on the lawsuit. The department also refused to say if it was investigating Sigman for excessive force.

Mitchell was charged with obstruction of justice, disorderly conduct and refusal to submit to arrest, noted the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

Sources: Arkansas Democrat-GazetteArkansas TimesNew York Daily News / Photo Credit: Blytheville, Arkansas Police Department via The Free Thought Project/YouTube

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