Society

Deadly Cape Cobra Snake Slithers Through Cape Town Waters (Photo)

| by Emily Smith

A deadly Cape cobra was captured in photos by a local strolling along Hout Bay Beach, who spotted the 6-foot long creature while it slithered through the water.

Hout Bay resident Jeffrey Rinks spotted the snake on a beach in Cape Town, then captured photos of it and posted them to social media websites. Many Twitter users expressed their shock and disbelief at the size of the snake, which was spotted near a beach known for its shark-infested waters.

“That’s fantastic, that’s a beautiful size,” Shaun Macleod, a snake and reptile expert who spoke on radio station 567 CapeTalk, said. “They seldom get to that size.”

Macleod explained that snakes often soak in the water when they’re about to shed their skin since its gets irritated. On this particular occasion, the snake probably ended up in the water because the photographer was blocking its route.

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“So the snake was trying everything it could to move away from the photographer and ended up in the water,” Macleod said. “It’s a fantastic shot. It looks like the guy’s having a surf.”

Despite its size, Macleod added that the snake would only become dangerous if it was disturbed or tampered by people. He noted that 98 percent of snake bites are self-inflicted.

Residents of the area, however, have not been calmed by Macleod’s expertise. Lungisa Benzile said that she would avoid the beach from now on and that the area has had problems with snakes in the past.

Rinks explained that the snake eventually moved to a more remote area of the beach, after he and a woman threw sand in its direction. Rinks reported that the snake settled on a log and that he stayed with it for about an hour.

Sources: Eyewitness News, DailyMail

Photo Source: Jeffrey Rinks/DailyMail, Wikipedia