Society

Melissa Bachman Causes Controversy In South Africa After Posting Photo Of Dead Lion

| by Khier Casino

Big-game hunter and U.S. television personality Melissa Bachman has caused controversy after posting a photo earlier this month of her posing while holding a rifle over a lion carcass.

According to Huffington Post, the Minnesota-based TV host shot and killed an African lion during her trip to South Africa and posted a picture via Twitter.

"An incredible day hunting in South Africa! Stalked inside 60-yards on this beautiful male lion...what a hunt!" the tweet said.

With the proper permits, hunting lions in South Africa is not illegal, but it did not stop angry animal lovers and Elan Burman who lives in Cape Town from starting a change.org petition calling for the South African government to ban Bachman from the country, ABC News reports.

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"She is an absolute contradiction to the culture of conservation, this country prides itself on," the petition reads. "As tax payers we demand she no longer be granted access to this country and its natural resources."

The petition has gained over 266,000 supporters as of writing this.

The hunting of the lion took place on the Maroi Conservancy, who defended the hunt on its Facebook page citing their motto is "conservation through sustainable hunting."

The post reads: “We are not apologising for facilitating the hunt. As for all the negative commentary towards us, please consider how much you have contributed to conservation in the past 5 years. If you are not a game farmer and struggling with dying starving animals, poaching and no fences in place to protect your animals and crop, please refrain from making negative degoratory comments. It is so easy to judge if you are staying in cities and towns [all sic].”

The meat from the animals that its members hunt, Maroi adds, is brought to a local community. The hunting funds are used to help fix a border fence, prevent poaching and manage "sustainable conservancy."