Exposing No Kill Shelters

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Last week was Christmas, Easter, New Year's, and all the holidays rolled into as one major expose of No Kill shelters was presented by PeTA. Those of us in the humane community have known of the deception of these No Kill shelters for awhile but now the world can see what we have seen and known. These aren't shelters at all, they are brokers. They pick and chose in order to not have to euthanize. They pick the best ones of the lot and ship the rest to those "kill" shelters that they criticize.

Earlier in the week, Nathan Winograd wrote a piece for the Huffington Post. He said nothing new for him, more accusations against PeTA, the same ones we have heard for years now. And as usual he offered no evidence of his claims. PeTA admits they euthanize animals, they aren't hiding it like No Kill shelters are doing. PeTA offers euthanasia service to those who can't afford the vet. PeTA is not an intake shelter either although there are times when they do handle adoptions, of course, they are in the business of helping pets. But it is not an intake shelter in the sense that Winograd presents.

Since PeTA offers this service, of course their numbers will reflect the euthanasia and it appears that they are "killing" all pets brought to them. Not true. Since they aren't a shelter, healthy pets are referred to other local shelters that do adoptions as a part of regular business. A humane society that runs a low cost spay/neuter clinic also offers free euthanasia, what would their numbers look like? The same. While no one is deliberately seeking to destroy healthy animals, Winograd distorts numbers in such a fashion as to make the uneducated believe.

With the advent of No Kill, scams and schemes have arisen. Randy Travis of Fox Atlanta exposed the well known and highly proclaimed No Kill shelter, Boggs Mountain, a few months ago. This No Kill shelter would take a donation from a pet owner telling them that if their pet was not adopted it would live it's life there. But they are so skilled at adoptions, that the pet will find a new home. Sure enough, the former owner would receive a postcard that their beloved pet had a new family. Not true, Boggs Mountain was sending them out the back door to be euthanized.

Spindletop was another No Kill shelter. Horrible cruelty was found there and again it was highly touted by No Kill. Also Caboodle Ranch, another favorite of the movement, busted for unspeakable cruelty to cats. The list goes on. Pet transports to the unknown is a scam with it's birth based in the movement of No Kill. It is a brokering business, not a true humane effort. These transports are delivering shelter pets to hoarders and cruel conditions. But they have full approval from No Kill.

Please take the time to watch the video. PeTA went to various No Kill shelters, including the one in Tompkins County where Winograd started his program. Public shelters are open door shelters, they take any and all at the time of presentation. Open door shelters usually are funded by cities and counties. And those shelters have as a first priority to serve the public health and safety needs, thus they take any and all because to do otherwise can put the public at risk. No Kill shelters that serve the public turn animals away, unaltered animals too. Those are dumped to reproduce or get hit by a car, or be shot by the neighborhood punks. It is inhumane to turn animals away when their owners need to surrender them. Most people surrender their pet because they can no longer care for it for whatever reason, unemployment, health. Turning away those owners puts the pet at risk and there is nothing humane about that. There are far worse things that can happen to a pet than being euthanized in the shelter. The video has no graphic pictures.

This video plainly shows that they are "turn away" shelters, not open door shelters as proclaimed by Nathan Winograd's No Kill. Is it humane to turn animals away in their time of need? Is this how you reach No Kill, by turning them away to live on the streets? Ask Mr. Winograd how this works. He will promptly tell you there is no pet overpopulation and to read his books for answers. But the answers aren't there in his biased books. The answer is to live in this world which has to deal with the pet overpopulation problem, not in Winograd's world of fantasy and make believe.