Society

Cockfighting: RSPCA Awarded over $90K Left by Gamblers at Melbourne Cockfight Bust

| by Phyllis M Daugherty
article imagearticle image

A bust of what is called one of Melbourne's biggest rings resulted in a judge ordering the more than $90,000 left behind in gambling wagers to be forfeited to the Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Before a cockfight begins, sharp blades are attached to the feet of both birds and they are placed in a pit to fight in a bloody bout where one of both will die, while bets are placed. Game roosters, known as fighting cocks, suffer repeated painful punctures and cuts from razor-sharp knives attached to their feet as they fight to survive for the entertain and greed of gamblers.

Last September, when a particularly bloody and brutal event was busted by the Victoria Police and Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), $90,742 was left in the ring--wagered on which bird could kill the other. The event took place in Melbourne's outer west on Neale Road, Rockbank

The practice was called “barbaric” by RSPCA senior inspector Daniel Bode who said at the time that birds suffered "extensive bleeding" and abrasions in the bouts.

The roosters taken from the ring could not be given a new home, as "they were bred for cockfighting ... (and are) very aggressive," Mr Bode said.

The Brimbank-region acting inspector Tim O'Connor said he had "never seen anything like this before."

The Brisbane Times reports that police charged the 86 people present as spectators under the Gambling Regulation Act, while the RSPCA charged the perpetrators with attending an event where an animal is encouraged to fight.

On Tuesday afternoon, June 11, the Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) was scheduled to receive that $90,742. The money will assist in their law-enforcement and other humane work for animals, including their efforts to combat cockfighting.

Source: The Age