Society

Newspaper Refuses To Print A Line In Vet's Obituary

| by Jonathan Constante

A Pennsylvania woman is upset with a newspaper after it refused to print a line in her father's paid obituary.

Heather Vargo's father, David Ryan, was a Vietnam veteran, WTAE reported. She paid more than $400 to have his obituary appear in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette for two days.

But when the newspaper was printed, Vargo noticed a line was missing. The line was supposed to read: "not a murderer, not a baby killer, just a Vietnam Vet."

The Vietnam War was one of the most controversial wars in U.S. history. Upon returning home from the war, many soldiers were met with protests. Some vets were spat on, had their cars egged and called "baby killers," notes an opinion article in StarTribune.

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Ryan was among those soldiers who were called "baby killers" when he returned home. Vargo said that stuck with him for years. She said the newspaper did not provide any reasons as to why it omitted the line from his obituary.

"They didn't give a reason," Vargo said. "They just said 'we cannot print this.'"

While the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette refused to print the line, the Penn Hills Progress included every line intended for the Vietnam vet's obituary on its website.

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Still, Vargo is upset with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

"I feel like he's being disrespected and I think that light needs to be shed on that fact," she said.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has not yet issued a statement.

Sources: WTAE, StarTribune / Photo credit: Ron Cogswell/Flickr, Supplied via Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

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