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Airline Sues To Block Attendant's Sex Diary Publication

| by David Bonner
Vintage photo of a stewardessVintage photo of a stewardess

A sex diary is at the center of a legal battle in the Netherlands.

The diary, which was written by a female flight attendant for the Dutch airline Transavia, was discovered by the woman's husband, who leaked it to the press, reports the Daily Mail.

The 46-year-old unnamed airline crew member kept the dairy on a computer, and it is said to contain details of sexual liaisons with her Transavia colleagues during stop-overs and in hotels.

In an apparent attempt to profit from his wife’s alleged adultery, the husband wants to publish the diary. The airline has taken the case to court to prevent its publication.

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The airline is also reportedly filing a lawsuit against the man directly. It is accusing him of also sharing his wife's email correspondence with third parties believed to include other staff.

“We take everything very seriously," a Transavia spokeswoman said in an official statement. "An internal research has shown that the safety of passengers was never in doubt. Our colleagues consider those emails as unwanted and unacceptable as they harm our interests.”

Emails between Transavia and the Dutch airline inspection authority have reportedly been leaked to Dutch newspaper Telegraaf, reports the Daily Mail. The emails allegedly indicate the authority considers the matter an internal issue for Transavia.

Regarding those emails, the airline spokeswoman said, “It is important in our personnel policy that we take care of our employees. We have talked to everybody, but for now we will not make any comments on that.”

Judges in The Hague will decide on the appeal on Oct. 24.

The occupation of “stewardess,” as airline flight attendants were once known, was invented in 1933, notes Kathleen M. Barry, author of the book “Femininity In Flight.”

As the Toledo Sunday Times explained at the time, a stewardess “goes to work 5,000 feet above the earth, rushing through space at a rate of three miles a minute. She has been eulogized, glorified, publicized, and fictionalized during her comparatively short existence. She has become the envy of stenographers in New York and farmers’ daughters in Iowa. She seems to be on the way to becoming to American girlhood what policemen, pilots, and cowboys are to American boyhood.”

Sources: Daily Mail, FemininityInFlight.com / Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

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