Society

$33,000 Spent On Sequestration For Zimmerman Jury, Includes Trips To Movies, Museum

| by Sylvan Lane
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We might never know how much of an emotional toll rendering the verdict in the George Zimmerman case took on the six women of the jury, but we now know how much their decision cost the state of Florida: $33,000, according to The Daily Mail.

The British paper reports:

It has been revealed that $33,000 was spent to sequester the six female jurors who acquitted George Zimmerman of any crime for fatally shooting Trayvon Martin.

The sheriff's office spent almost 10 times that amount — $320,000 — on total costs related to the trial, including overtime and equipment, according to details released on Wednesday by the Seminole County Sheriff's Office.

During their three weeks of sequestration, jurors took an excursion to St. Augustine, Fla., watched the movies 'The Lone Ranger' and 'World War Z,' went on bowling excursions and saw Fourth of July fireworks.

According to UPI, “During the sequestration, which began on June 22 and lasted for 22 days, the six jurors in the trial stayed at the Marriott on International Parkway in Lake Mary, Fla., where they ate most of their meals and were allowed to have visitors, who were required to sign an agreement stating that they would not talk about the Zimmerman trial, the SCSO said.”

"It certainly seems reasonable to me that a woman would desire a bit of personal grooming over 22 days," said Randy Reep, a Florida attorney, to USA Today. "Going to the movies and having basic levels of entertainment — I cannot see Ripley's to be extravagant — seems very reasonable over three weeks."

Reep added, "These women of course are not criminals, yet we took them from their families. While we did not say this then, now it is clear half of the country is going to very vocally find fault with your dedicated effort. A Bloomin Onion at Outback would not adequately reimburse these women for the bitterness" some will feel toward them.

 

Sources: The Daily Mail, UPI, USA Today