Society

'It Feels Like Acid': Oklahoma Executes First Inmate Since Botched Injection

| by Tony Tran
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“My body is on fire."

On Thursday night, Oklahoma executed Charles Warner, who was convicted of the rape and murder of an 11-month-old girl, in its first execution since the botched lethal injection of Clayton Lockett in April.

In 2003, Warner was convicted of the first-degree rape and murder of his then girlfriend’s 11-month-old daughter in the Summer of 1997.

The state of Oklahoma sentenced him to be executed in April on the same night as Clayton Lockett. However, after Lockett began moaning and writhing on the gurney after he was declared to be unconscious, the state delayed all executions until they investigated the cause of the botched execution.

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This judge looked an inmate square in the eyes and did something that left the entire courtroom in tears:

In response to the mismanaged lethal injection, Oklahoma increased the amount of sedative used by five times, mirroring the recipe that Florida used in nearly a dozen successful executions.

Before the injection, Warner was asked for his final words to which he responded, “Before I give my final statement, I’ll tell you they poked me five times and it feels like acid.

“I’m sorry for all of the pain I caused," Warner continued. "I’m not a monster. I didn’t do everything they said I did. I love people. I love my family. I love Jesus."

He went on to thank his mother and sister for their support, and said to “tell my baby girl she means the world to me.”

According to NBC, after the first of the three drugs were administered, Warner said, “My body is on fire. No one should go through this. I’m not afraid to die.” He showed no other signs of physical distress afterwards.

He was declared dead at 7:28 p.m Central Time.

Madeline Cohen, Warner’s attorney, was there to witness the executions and said that due to a second drug, a paralytic, there was no way to tell if Warner was suffering or not.

“Because Oklahoma injected Mr. Warner with a paralytic tonight, acting as a chemical veil, we will never know whether he experienced the intense pain of suffocation and burning that would result from injecting a conscious person with rocuronium bromide and potassium chloride,” Cohen said.

The decision to follow through with Warner’s execution comes at the heels of a divided Supreme Court vote that said it wouldn’t consider an appeal over drugs.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor expressed her apprehensions regarding the use of the untested drugs saying: “Petitioners have committed horrific crimes, and should be punished. But the Eighth Amendment guarantees that no one should be subjected to an execution that causes searing, unnecessary pain before death.”

Sources: The Huffington Post, NBC, CNN Photo Credit: Wikipedia, PennLive.com