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Veteran Converts His Wheelchair Into Snow Plow (Photo)

| by Reve Fisher
Justin Anderson in his wheelchair-snow plowJustin Anderson in his wheelchair-snow plow

After serving his country, one veteran has decided to serve his community by converting his wheelchair into a snow plow.

Whenever snow falls in his neighborhood in Bellevue, Nebraska, Iraq War Veteran Justin Anderson lends a helping hand by plowing the sidewalks with his off-road wheelchair.

“I don't want kids or parents having to go through the snow and possibly trip or hurt themselves,” Anderson said to WOWT News.

Due to the way in which his all-terrain wheelchair is designed, Anderson is able to easily maneuver through the neighborhood, despite the snowy weather.

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“I had a half-dozen people stop to take a picture because they hadn't seen a chair like this before,” he said.

In 2015, he thought to add a snow blade to the front of his chair. Every snowfall since then, he heads out to help his community.

“The chair has on-the-fly tilt so I can adjust the height of the blade as I push snow,” Anderson said.

While the modifications were his own, Anderson's all-terrain wheelchair was provided by the Mobility Program of a non-profit organization called The Independence Fund. The foundation supports injured and wounded veterans by giving them the tools and resources required to live independently, including Hyperbarcic Oxygen Therapy and wellness programs, national caregiving retreats, and mobility devices such as off-road wheelchairs and adaptive bicycles, according to the organization's website.

Anderson is more than happy to assist the neighborhood after the support the residents have shown him while he was undergoing health problems.

“The community has supported me immensely with my struggles and tough times as I had a leg amputated and my fight with brain cancer,” he told WOWT News. “This is my way of giving back.”

As a former serviceman, Anderson said that even if no one expressed any gratitude towards him for these actions, he would still want to help his community.

“It's very gratifying,” Anderson explained. “It's nice to know you're appreciated. But even if I didn't get any response from anyone – or nobody said Thank You – I'd still do it.”

Sources: WOWT News, The Independence Fund / Photo Credit: WOWT News, Tim Sackton/Flickr