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Man Held At Knife Point Apologizes For Flirting (Video)

| by Sheena Vasani
Screenshot Of Disturbing VideoScreenshot Of Disturbing Video

A jealous girlfriend made her boyfriend publicly apologize on video for his flirtatious behavior while holding a knife to his neck (video below).

“Say it, I said say it!” the dark-haired woman demands her boyfriend, whose face is blurred, proclaim to the world on video, the Daily Mail reports. The black-haired man obeys, stating, “You hoes need to stop commenting on my Instagram pictures you are f------ up our relationship.”

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“And me and Riley are in love y'all, hoes don't matter,” he adds, after she probes him into continuing by slapping him in the face.

“That's right” the girlfriend says at the end.

It is unclear who the two are, where in the U.S. they are from, or if the video was staged.

While disturbing, this type of abuse is common.

According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Department of Justice 2010 national survey, more men than women have been physically assaulted by their partners.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline notes men are less likely to report this type abuse for fear of seeming less manly.

“Men are socialized not to express their feelings or see themselves as victims," the hotline’s blog reads. "Our culture still clings to narrow definitions of gender (although there are signs that this is slowly shifting). Young boys are taught not to express their emotions, to 'suck it up' and 'be a man.'"

It adds, “This can be extremely detrimental to boys as they age, especially if they find themselves in an abusive relationship. Men may feel discouraged to talk about what’s going on in their personal lives, or they feel like no one will believe them. They may not even realize that they are being abused, or they might assume they should just deal with the abuse on their own.”

In addition, the hotline explains how media narratives often stereotype heterosexual men as villains while women are victims which “renders invisible the many scenarios that do not fit this definition.”

Sources: Daily MailCDC, The National Domestic Violence Hotline / Photo credit: Daily Mail