Social

'Tip The Schools': Waitress Writes Note On Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback's Receipt

| by Lisa Fogarty
tphototphoto

Republican Gov. Sam Brownback of Kansas wasn't asked to leave a tip when he recently visited Boss Hawg's Barbecue in Topeka -- instead, his waitress wrote an interesting request on his receipt that has since gone viral.

Chloe Hough had recently resigned from her waitressing job at the popular restaurant and was working her very last shift when Brownback and his family sat down in her section, reports KSNT. She posted a message on Facebook, asking others what she should say to him: "You guys 911 emergency. It's my last shift and I am waiting on our governor. What should I say to him. This is not a test. Go."

Then she got an idea.

When she delivered the receipt to the governor's table, she crossed out the line where it asked for a tip and gave Brownback a tip of her own instead:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

The receipt reads: "Tip the schools." She posted the image to Facebook with the caption, "Mic Drop" and it has since been shared hundreds of times on Facebook and Twitter.

Hough, who worked at the restaurant for one year, says she wasn't trying to be malicious, but felt compelled to voice her objection to the "block grant," which Brownback signed in March, despite having little support among Kansas educators.

"I just knew I had to say something or I would regret it," Hough said.

--

Related Video:

--

The new law, which Brownback reportedly signed into effect just one week after it was introduced and without media present, replaces state funding to schools with two years of block grants, reports The Kansas City Star. Opponents of the law say it will cut funding to early childhood education, increase class sizes, and limit the number of resources available to gifted students and students with special needs.

Six Kansas school districts have had to close early this year due to the unexpected cuts to school funding, Opposing Views previously reported. The bill cut $51 million in school funding for the remainder of the year.

RELATED: Republicans Who Became Democrats

Sources: KSNT, The Kansas City Star, Opposing Views

Photo Credit: Facebook via KSNT