Social

Another Facebook Privacy Hoax To Watch Out For

| by Amanda Andrade-Rhoades
person using Facebook on their phoneperson using Facebook on their phone

It seems every few months Facebook is flooded with copy-and-paste privacy warnings filled with legal jargon. These warnings, however, are merely scams aimed to preying on your fears.

CNet reported the most recent example of these hoaxes:

“As of September 28th , 2015 at 10:50p.m. Eastern standard time, I do not give Facebook or any entities associated with Facebook permission to use my pictures, information, or posts, both past and future. By this statement, I give notice to Facebook it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, or take any other action against me based on this profile and/or its contents.”

In addition to the privacy warning, there’s another hoax post circulating around Facebook, which reads:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

“Now it's official! It has been published in the media. Facebook has just released the entry price: $5.99 to keep the subscription of your status to be set to 'private.' If you paste this message on your page, it will be offered free (I said paste not share) if not tomorrow, all your posts can become public.”

Facebook lightheartedly addressed the copy-and-paste statuses on their page on Sept. 28.

“While there may be water on Mars, don't believe everything you read on the internet today," their Facebook post reads. "Facebook is free and it always will be. And the thing about copying and pasting a legal notice is just a hoax. Stay safe out there Earthlings!”

By signing up for Facebook, users must agree to the social media monolith’s privacy policy as well as its terms and policies, Snopes, a rumor debunking website, reported. However, individuals have the right to stay off of Facebook or lobby for the site to change its policies through its Facebook Site Governance section.

Sources: CNET, Facebook, Snopes / Photo Credit: Maria Elena/Flickr, Neeraj Kumar/Flickr