Texas Police Officers' 'His Life Matters' Photo Goes Viral

| by Nathaly Pesantez

A photo of two Texas police officers, one black and one white, is making waves across social media, all for a statement they've written on their palms.

The photo, tweeted by the Trinity Police Department, shows Trinity Police Chief Steven Jones and Officer Donald Givens side by side, arms extended and palms facing the viewer. Each officer's palm contains the words, "His Life Matters," with an arrow pointing to the opposite officer.

The May 6 tweet caught the attention of the American Conservatives of Color (ACOC), a Colorado-based political group who shared the photo through their Facebook page on Aug. 10.

The Facebook post has since been shared over 100,000 times.

"His Life Matters" is reportedly in response to the "Black Lives Matter" movement, which denounces police treatment of African Americans and the "anti-black racism" of society.

While some see the phrase on the police officers' palms as unifying and uplifting, others feel the action undermines the plight of black Americans and other minority communities.

"Fighting to stop racially motivated shootings and other unjust criminal justice action, by no means indicates that white lives don't matter," a Facebook comment on the photo reads. "The movement simply highlights the clear, data supported…disproportionate actions against people of color."

A string of politicians have come under scrutiny regarding the "Black Lives Matter" movement.

In June, Hillary Clinton was the target of much criticism after saying "all lives matter" at a historical black church near Ferguson, Missouri, where Michael Brown was killed last year.

During a protest in July, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley said that "all lives matter," drawing a negative response from the large gathering.

Jones and Givens were in the spotlight briefly in 2012, when they were featured in CMT's reality series "Big Texas Heat" alongside other officers, according to KTRE.

Sources: KTRETrinity Police Dept. Twitter , ACOC FacebookBlack Lives MatterNPRTime / Photo Credit: Trinity Police Department