'I Think It's Hysterical': Man Receives Note On Jetta Informing Him Of Volkswagen Scandal (Photo)

| by Jared Keever
Note left on man's JettaNote left on man's Jetta

As the Volkswagen emissions scandal continues, a Portland, Oregon, sandwich shop owner says he received a note on his Jetta telling him he should consider buying another car. 

Rick Gencarelli, the owner of Portland sandwich shop, Lardo, told the Oregonian that his wife found the note on his 2011 Jetta on Sept. 27. His Jetta is equipped with Volkswagen’s TDI engine, the diesel engine at the center of the scandal. 

The note reads:

Hello VW TDI Owner,

While cute, your TDI is outfitted with a cheating device meant to elude emissions standards. 

Your car is currently polluting at rates higher than nearly any modern gasoline car today. 2-4x more than a Chevy Suburban. 

Not to mention that VW lied to you and the public. 

And was founded by Nazis. :(

Perhaps it’s time to consider a different car?

-A sympathetic and concerned citizen of Portland. 

Gencarelli posted a photo of the note to his Instagram account Sept. 28. 

“I think it's hysterical, and and I love the response that it's gotten,” he told The Oregonian.

He seemed to shrug off any suggestion that he was doing anything wrong by driving his car. 

“It's like, all right, we all got tricked,” he said. “VW screwed up and we're all victims.”

Earlier this month, Volkswagen was found to have falsified U.S. pollution tests on some 500,000 vehicles fitted with the TDI diesel engine by installing so-called defeat devices to make their emissions appear cleaner when tested, CNN Money reports. Under normal operating conditions, the cars reportedly emit as much as 40 times the permitted levels of nitrogen oxides. 

Since news of the scandal broke, the company’s CEO has resigned and a reported quarter of the company’s market value was wiped out in a single week. 

The company has reportedly set aside over $7 billion to cover the costs of recalls and making the engines compliant. Volkswagen could face up to $18 billion in fines in the U.S. for the falsified tests. 

Sources: The Oregonian, Instagram: @lardopdx, CNN Money

Photo credit: Instagram: @lardopdx, Scott Molineaux/Flickr