People Unaware Who Washington D.C. Is Named For (Video)

| by Michael Allen
Mark Dice ManMark Dice Man

Prankster and political gadfly Mark Dice asked people in San Diego if they could name the person whom the nation's capital, Washington, D.C, was named after (video below).

In the video, posted to Dice's YouTube channel on March 7, one woman responds: "Why you gotta ask me something like that, can I Google it?”

Eventually she relents and says, "I don't know, I give up, I plead the Fifth."

Dice asks two more women the same question, and one of them replies, "Our nation's capital?" and the other states, "I have no idea," and her friend adds, "You have to tell us."

Dice asks a fourth woman who replies, "George Washington," but Dice asks her, "Are you sure?"

“No, I don’t really care,” she laughs.

“I’m gonna have to go with, yeah, I don’t know,” a young man with a surfboard tells Dice.

Dice asks a man wearing an “I (Heart) DC” T-shirt who the nation's capital is named after, and the T-shirt guy replies, "I don’t know, I just woke up, what is this for anyways?”

Dice tries to walk the man through a connection between his T-shirt and George Washington, but the man cannot recall the president's first name.

“Our nation’s capital is Washington, D.C., I don’t know who it’s named after,” another man tells Dice.

“A president, some president, I don’t know, is it true?” the man's girlfriend asks Dice.

An older woman says that Dice's question is a "Jay Leno thing," and then states, “Lincoln."

Dice replies, "Lincoln, D.C."

Dice interviews a couple from Italy, who know the correct answer, and Dice tells them: "We're just talking to stupid Americans. Many of them don't know who our nation's capital is named after."

The Italian woman replies, "How is that possible?"

According to a 2014 global survey by Ipsos MORI, Italy was ranked first in an index of ignorance among 14 countries, and the U.S. was ranked second.

The survey noted that Americans thought their birth rate for teen moms, aged 15-19, was 24 percent when it was really 3 percent.

Additionally, Americans thought 56 percent of there country was Christian, when the real number is 78 percent.

Sources: MarkDice/YouTube, Ipsos MORI / Photo credit: MarkDice/YouTube

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